Modeling and optimization of processing parameters of strips produced from blends of cassava and cowpea flour

  • James Abiodun Adeyanju Department of Food Engineering, Ladoke Akintola University of Technology, Ogbomoso, Nigeria
  • Adekanmi Olusegun Abioye Department of Food Engineering, Ladoke Akintola University of Technology, Ogbomoso, Nigeria
  • Grace Oluwatoyin Ogunlakin Department of Food Engineering, Ladoke Akintola University of Technology, Ogbomoso, Nigeria
  • Olusegun James Oyelade Department of Food Engineering, Ladoke Akintola University of Technology, Ogbomoso, Nigeria
  • Deborah Adeola Adesina Department of Food Engineering, Ladoke Akintola University of Technology, Ogbomoso, Nigeria
  • Abiola Adewale Oloyede Department of Food Engineering, Ladoke Akintola University of Technology, Ogbomoso, Nigeria
Keywords: Box-Behnken Design, Frying Temperature, Frying Time, Optimization, Quality Attributes

Abstract

Most Nigerian traditional foods have a low nutritional value, inconsistent sensory attributes, and short shelf life. Thus, upgrading becomes necessary for the technologies used in the processing, distributing, and storing of indigenous snack foods to improve the products' nutritional, sensory, and storage properties. A Box-Behnken (three-factor) response surface methodology was used to optimize the process. The effect of frying temperature (160 - 180°C), frying time (8 - 12 min) and percent cowpea flour (10 - 30%) on some attributes (moisture, fat, protein contents, texture, and color change) of cassava-cowpea strips fried snack. Data were analyzed by ANOVA and regression analysis. The moisture content ranged between 1.00% and 4.26%, fat content (8.41–11.94%), protein content (30.83–36.42%), texture (5.06–13.14 N) and color change (26.967–40.479). Frying temperature, frying time and % cowpea flour had a significant (P < 0.05) effect on moisture, fat, protein contents, texture and color change of cassava-cowpea strips. The processing conditions affected moisture, fat, protein, texture, and color change. Coefficients of determination, R2 were 0.87, 0.86, 0.79, 0.88 and 0.71, respectively. The best conditions for processing cassava-cowpea strips were 12 min frying time, 166.65 °C frying temperature, and 24.36% cowpea flour content. The desirability of optimization was 0.65. Therefore, composite flour from cassava and cowpea can be adopted or used to produce strips to prevent protein-energy malnutrition in the community.

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Author Biographies

James Abiodun Adeyanju, Department of Food Engineering, Ladoke Akintola University of Technology, Ogbomoso, Nigeria

Department of Food Engineering 

Associate Professor

Olusegun James Oyelade, Department of Food Engineering, Ladoke Akintola University of Technology, Ogbomoso, Nigeria

Department of Food Engineering

Professor

Deborah Adeola Adesina, Department of Food Engineering, Ladoke Akintola University of Technology, Ogbomoso, Nigeria

Department of food Engineering

Graduate Student

Abiola Adewale Oloyede, Department of Food Engineering, Ladoke Akintola University of Technology, Ogbomoso, Nigeria

Food Engineering Department

Graduate student

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Modeling and optimization of processing parameters of strips produced from blends of cassava and cowpea flour
Published
2022-10-02
How to Cite
1.
Adeyanju JA, Abioye AO, Ogunlakin GO, Oyelade O, Adesina D, Oloyede A. Modeling and optimization of processing parameters of strips produced from blends of cassava and cowpea flour. Alger. J. Eng. Technol. [Internet]. 2022Oct.2 [cited 2022Dec.3];. Available from: https://jetjournal.org/index.php/ajet/article/view/236
Section
Food Engineering